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Crypto Scam Alerts: How to spot and avoid them
Crypto Scam Alerts: How to spot and avoid them

Recognizing and Avoiding Crypto Scams and Impersonations

Matias Fabius avatar
Written by Matias Fabius
Updated this week

With the rising popularity and adoption of cryptocurrencies, scams and fraudulent activities have unfortunately become more prevalent. It is crucial now more than ever to stay vigilant and safeguard your crypto assets from unscrupulous individuals.

What Scammers can do to you?

While Zengo is well secured and is resilient against account takeovers and sim swaps (no seed phrases or passwords to lose or share), scammers can still :

  • Lure new and unaware users into sending funds from their Zengo to another wallet that could not be reversible and lost forever.

  • cause new users to install malware apps that drain your computer and can harm other apps and data (unrelated to Zengo)

  • cause new users to install fake and malicious apps using the Zengo name

At Zengo, we prioritize the security and protection of our users, and one fundamental aspect to consider is the authenticity of email communication.

We only use zengo.com and emails @zengo.com

All official communication from Zengo will come exclusively from the @zengo.com domain.

This means that any email claiming to be Zengo but using a different domain is not legitimate. By remaining vigilant and verifying the email address, you can protect yourself from falling victim to scams and ensure that your interactions with Zengo are secure and trustworthy.

Beware of fake Zengo emails about deposit and activation scams

Zengo will never ask for any activation deposit. Period.

If you receive an email requesting you to "activate" your account with a deposit, similar to the image depicted below, this is a scam. Do not engage further.

All authentic communications from us are sent exclusively from the @zengo.com domain, and we never ask for a deposit to activate Zengo, which is a free app. A careful comparison will quickly confirm that such deceptive emails are not from us.

It's probable that you shared your email address with someone on social media who is now misrepresenting themselves as us and, in general, never engage in trading or investments with people you randomly met via social media. Please stay vigilant of such impersonations.

This is what those emails look like

Beware of Zengo impersonation scams targeting influencers.

We have identified a recent scam where fraudsters impersonate Zengo or some of our team members to approach influencers on social media, promising a large paid campaign. They send deceptive emails, inviting influencers to collaborate with us. The intention is to lure the recipients into depositing money or downloading malicious software.

Please be aware all official Zengo communication will always come from an @zengo.com email address. If you're approached with an invitation to work with Zengo, please double-check the sender's email address.

If you encounter any suspicious emails claiming to be from Zengo, do not hesitate to report them to us at help@zengo.com. Your vigilance helps keep our community safe.

This is the type of email scammers send

How to easily find the original email sending address

Scammers impersonate Zengo with fake email addresses like zengostudio.pl or zengowallet @ gmail.com and many more

In order to easily find out if an email is indeed sent from @Zengo.com please follow the following steps

**Gmail**

  1. Open the email you want to check.

  2. Click on the "More" (three vertical dots) button next to the "Reply" button on the right side of the email header.

  3. Click on "Show original" from the drop-down menu.

  4. This will open a new tab with the original email information. Look for "Received: from" in the header. The IP address listed in brackets after "Received: from" is the sender's IP address.

  5. Below this, you should see a line that says "from". This will usually contain the sender's email address.

**Outlook**

  1. Open the email you want to check.

  2. Click on the "More actions" (three horizontal dots) button located at the top right of the email header.

  3. Click on "View message source" from the drop-down menu.

  4. This will open a new tab or window with the original email information. Look for "Received: from" in the header. The IP address listed in brackets after "Received: from" is the sender's IP address.

  5. Below this, you should see a line that says "from". This will usually contain the sender's email address.

Please note that this information might not always accurately reflect the original sender. There are many ways for an email to be spoofed or for the information to be masked, especially if it's spam or malicious email. It's also worth noting that email headers contain a lot of information and can be quite complex. You may need to do a bit of detective work to find the exact information you're looking for.

Also, it's important to respect privacy and not misuse this information. It's generally best to only use this for troubleshooting purposes or to verify the legitimacy of an email when you have doubts. Always follow ethical guidelines and legal regulations when handling personal information.

Additional tips

  • Beware that scammers build impersonating websites that will look like Zengo’s website and will include redirecting links to our original website.

  • The only link that is legitimate is Zengo.com and nothing else.

  • Top spot a scam-impersonating link. Hover your mouse on the link and see what your browser shows before you click.

  • Never engage in trading or investment with people met on social media or dating sites

  • Never follow the recommendations of scammers leaving positive reviews on Trustpilot or the apple app store or google play store, claiming they have ways to invest or recover lost funds

  • Our original Twitter account is @ ZenGo

  • Beware of employee impersonators on Linkedin.

  • If you have any doubts, contact immediately our customer support in-app only to ask for clarification

  • here are more tips on how to spot different types of scams.

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